The brains behind Obama’s Speech…

Posted: February 11, 2009 in Politics

Barack Obama’s inaugural address is no doubt one of the best pieces ever written. In my opinion it should be ranked at the top alongside the ‘I Have a Dream‘ speech by Dr. Martin Luther King or somewhere alongside Malcom X’s The Ballot or the Bullet speech of 1965. I say so because it not only tackled the core issues that Americans struggle with but it also invoked a sense of responsibility in ordinary people to take action.

I’m particularly in awe having recently found out that Obama’s inaugural speech was crafted by one Jon Favreau, a young man, barely 27 years of age but has rubbed shoulders with some of America’s high and mighty. A quick background check reveals that Favreau or ‘Favs’ as he is fondly known by his colleagues was discovered almost by chance while working on John Kerry’s failed presidential bid about four years ago. He studied Obama’s former speeches with the precision of a stalker and went on to draft some amazing pieces one of them the speech that helped to turn Iowa for Obama. He wrote it from a coffee shop!

Obama’s inaugural address was significant as this was the first time a black president was taking the most powerful position in existence. Somewhere, in the midst of the crowd stood Jon Favreau, probably saying the words by heart as Obama read them out. And thrilled he must have been for the speech was ‘perfect’. Obama is an accomplished writer in his own right and for Jon Favreau this was obviously not a hard act to follow. The message was delivered in the simplest language possible. The choice of words captured both the mood and importance of the occasion. He began with the pertinent issues and moved on to inspire and reming Americans that indeed th future was bright. Most Americans and indeed the entire world will live to remember this speech for one reason or the other.

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